Meet your friendly neighbourhood Tattoo Artist

first_imgIf you would be interested in being a speaker, you can contact Morgan Churchill by email at programs@fsjpl.caTo view the FB event page; CLICK HERE FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The FSJ Public Library is hosting another ‘Every Experts’ event on Tattoo Artists with guest speaker Silena Ann Ewen.‘Everyday Experts’ is an opportunity facilitated by the FSJ Public Library to open a dialogue of learning through meeting with professionals and asking questions.- Advertisement -Saturday, November 9th, 2019, from 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM, come to the Library to meet Silena Ann Ewen and learn more about the art, science, history, laws, and craft of tattooing.Ewen was born and raised in Fort St. John and who is now based out of Invermere. A Tattoo Artist and former Fine Arts Teacher Ewen will answer questions and share knowledge.This discussion is appropriate for all interested ages.The Library is interested in developing opportunities for ‘Everyday Experts,’ who may be either professionals or passionate hobbyists, to share their expertise with the public.Advertisementlast_img read more

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Father tries to finish story of son killed in Iraq

first_imgDarrell Griffin Sr. tensed with anticipation the moment the C-130 Hercules hit the tarmac. As the noisy turboprop cargo plane’s wheels rolled along the runway of Baghdad International Airport, the September heat felt like 140 degrees. Griffin stood up, shifting under the weight of 80 pounds of body armor and a Kevlar helmet. The 55-year-old Van Nuys accountant grabbed his bags, stepped out the door and ran for his life toward the terminal. There could be snipers, he was told. He knew all about snipers. March 21, 2007, Baghdad, Camp StrikerStaff Sgt. Darrell Griffin Jr. met his squad mates at 0800, grinning and upbeat. The other soldiers of Charger Company were tired and restless. They’d been in Iraq almost a year and the deployment was wearing on them. Too many long patrols in their massive, wheeled Strykers. Too many bodies blown up by roadside bombs. Comrades shot to pieces. They hadn’t slept well or showered for days. They didn’t even have food. But Griff, all 6 feet 2 inches, 240 pounds of him, couldn’t stop smiling. He’d been blessed in his time with the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Infantry Regiment, Third Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division. He’d been writing a book about his experience and had hundreds of pages of material. “I feel like God’s got something really big planned for me today,” he said. Two hours later, a sniper shot him through the back of the head. March 21, 2007, Van NuysDarrell Griffin Sr. was visiting a client. His cell phone rang – Kim, his wife. He answered and found her upset. “Skip’s been shot,” she told him, using Darrell Jr.’s nickname. “How bad is it?” he asked, hoping this was just another flesh wound requiring stitches. His wife began to cry. “It’s fatal,” she told him. He dropped the phone and ran out of the office in tears. That night, he got a knock on his door from two men, dressed in green Army uniforms – casualty assistance officers. His 36-year-old son’s mission was over. His own was just beginning. I am attempting to create an account of two tours of combat in Iraq as an infantryman. I am trying to make sense of a world that I had never known until the first time that I had to kill a man. A world where men wanted to kill me and a world where friends didn’t just move away but died violent deaths on the field of battle. … If nothing else, this attempt at a book will hopefully put to rest the demons that I have courted by killing and living in this chaotic world for two years. – Darrell Griffin Jr. Growing up in Van Nuys, Skip never put much stock in school. He spent a lot of time in detention. He ran away from home more than once. He dropped out of Van Nuys High School and got a GED. But he never stopped studying. He was a macho guy who worked out and held manly, physically demanding jobs, but he enjoyed nothing more than sitting down with a nice glass of Merlot, Mozart’s Requiem and a philosophical text. The Bible. Kierkegaard. Nietzsche. Chomsky. Skip inhaled them, reading three at a time and racking up hundreds of dollars worth of bills at esoteric bookstores. It was his dream to join their scholarly ranks, to publish a text of his thoughts on life and war and all the horrible things he’d seen in far away places called Najaf, Tal Afar and Sadr City. He’d been poking away at it for years, writing out longhand, diagramming his thoughts in elegant, tight printing. He taught himself to read and write Greek so he could channel the thoughts of his ancient heroes. The philosopher with the M4 rifle called his ruminations on spirituality, life and love “The Long Conversation.” After a stint in the National Guard, Skip enlisted in the Army in June 2001 and his thoughts turned to military affairs. When he deployed to Iraq for the first time in October 2004, his father encouraged him to keep a journal, and they planned to transform the 400 pages of ponderings, battle books and e-mails into a book. “He was the smartest man I’ve ever known,” Darrell Griffin Sr. said. “He was synthesizing the great philosophers with the realities of a foot soldier.” With his son dead, his father knew he had to complete that synthesis. As he made arrangements for Skip’s funeral, he began planning to pick up where his son left off. Please pray for this guy because he is such a good man and it doesn’t look like he will make it right now. The other 2 injured are in serious but stable condition and are expected to be ok. Dad, I would love nothing more than to be a child again being held in your arms as I have always remembered. when we meet again I need a hug from you and mom and I need to just cry in your arms. Well, back to being a leader. I have to be strong for my guys because they are watching my reaction to all of this and follow my lead when it comes to the mood of things. – Darrell Griffin Jr. He signed the 2005 e-mail “your faithful son, Lil’ Skip.” The soldier’s messages back to his wife, Diana, father, stepmother and five siblings alternated between gruesome details of the horror of battle – a dog dragging away a corpse’s head, a body identified only by its shoes because nothing else remained, trucks awash with blood and guts – and tender remembrances of home. He called Diana frequently and sent her love poems. “He’d ask me to pray for him and his soldiers,” she said. “He said, `I hope you won’t look at me differently for the things I had to do.’ I told him, `Don’t stop and think, just do what you have to.”‘ And sometimes, those things were terrible. He pulled a comrade from a Stryker whose legs stayed behind in the wrecked armored vehicle. He killed at least eight men. He’d smelled the stink of death before and ducked bullets as an emergency medical technician in Compton, but he was profoundly affected by the war. Two days after his son’s death, Darrell Griffin Sr. placed a call to Rep. Howard Berman’s office. He was a writer, too, he told them, and he wanted to go to Iraq. He wanted to meet the men who served with his son. He wanted to see where Skip died. When he called Berman’s office, Griffin was upfront: I’m a conservative Republican, the congressman’s a liberal Democrat and I didn’t vote for him. But I need your help. Staffers began making calls. The grieving father also reached out to Alex Kingsbury, an associate editor with U.S. News & World Report who’d interviewed his son at length a few days before he died. Kingsbury had met Griff while embedded with Charger Company in early March and included him as a minor character in a piece about a firefight near a helicopter crash. The two hit it off and enjoyed a long conversation about Nietzsche and Marshall McLuhan in the middle of the desert. “He looked to philosophy as a crutch,” Kingsbury said. “It was a filter for the tough, tough things he’d seen. In Iraq, there are horrible things you have to deal with daily. He wasn’t a mechanical killer who didn’t think about what he was doing. He thought about it. A lot.” As of late I have started to wonder whether or not we are killing insurgents or merely combatants fighting each other in a “war of all against all.” At this stage of the war, I choose not to use the word “insurgent” as a description of who I am trying to kill. – Darrell Griffin Jr. Darrell Griffin Sr. and Diana Griffin both asked Kingsbury for any other notes or memories he had of the sergeant. He did – nearly half an hour of video he’d shot in a deserted mess tent. And Griff’s death hit him hard, as well. He’d been so impressed by his eloquence that he was planning a longer article on warriors’ struggles to cope with the death they deal out daily. Griff was going to be the main subject. The Griffins asked Kingsbury to speak at the funeral, which he did, sharing Griff’s passion for history, great minds and the military’s traditions. Then he wrote an intensely personal, haunting account of their brief meeting in Iraq and the legacy Darrell Griffin Jr. left behind, published in early May. The article, peppered with Griff’s e-mails home, really got things rolling. Berman read it, Pentagon officials read it, everyday soldiers read it. His father’s quest to get to Baghdad suddenly had much more weight when people realized whose life he was trying to retell. “It made it more meaningful, reading what his son had written,” Berman said. “It changed me. It personalized it. He grew up in my area. … This is what he was going though. This is what he thought about, this is how he felt.” He personally pressed the Department of Defense to accredit Griffin Sr. as a journalist. With Berman’s help, the man who’d only authored a text on the importance of small business got credentialed to embed as a journalist with his son’s Stryker unit as it finished its Baghdad deployment. Skip had told him what it was like, but Griffin Sr. never felt like he got the full picture. He needed to fill it in himself. “I had to experience that fear,” he said. “I had to understand what he’d been through.” He’d had a little time in the military, joining the National Guard as a cook to avoid Vietnam in the 1970s, but nothing like he was about to experience. “Darrell Jr. was a big, tall, strapping, Rambo-looking guy,” Kingsbury said. “His father’s not muscular, not strapping-looking at all and he’s an accountant as opposed to an infantryman in Iraq. But Darrell Sr.’s a brave guy. He might not look the same as his son, but he’s just as brave.” It took a few months, but by early September, Griffin Sr. found himself shuttling through Baghdad hot zones on his way to Camp Striker. It was hot and frightening. His military escorts to the airport in Kuwait each dressed in civilian clothes to blend in and strapped on a pair of .45s for the drive. He slept in Army tents and rode around in a heavily armored truck known as The Rhino he described as “a Winnebago on steroids.” Griffin Sr. missed Charger Company’s last mission, but spent three days meeting the soldiers his son loved, fought for and died alongside. He ate in the dining facility where his son chowed down, used the phones with which he called home, shopped at the same post exchange. “My vision of Skip is my son, the kid I used to change diapers for,” he said. “These guys painted a different picture: of a real man, a hero.” The kind of guy who could have stayed back while his squad fought things out, but instead waded right into the firefight. A leader who told his troops to call him Griff or Darrell when the brass wasn’t around, rather than by his rank. Griff was laid back back at the base, but fierce and intense in the field. He won a Bronze Star for valorous conduct while dragging a wounded comrade to safety. He’d start each mission by placing his fist on his chest and uttering his motto: “Strength and Honor.” When the smoke cleared and they headed back to base, he’d tell them to light up cigars and celebrate making it home alive. March 21, 2007, Sadr CityGriff’s Stryker hit Iris Avenue when small arms fire pierced the morning air. The sergeant was at the rear, head poking out of the hatch. The squad heard a crack and saw Griff’s body seize up. They yanked him back inside and saw the head wound, just below his helmet. A sergeant cradled him. A lieutenant screamed for him to hold on, and they rushed him to another Stryker to administer first aid. His breath came in ragged spurts, then slowed to shallow, feeble gasps. The soldiers called in an air evac chopper and it lifted off, speeding him to the hospital. He stopped breathing on the way. Griff was dead. Oct. 3, 2007, Van NuysDarrell Griffin Sr. sat in his small office, surrounded by pictures of his six children and a box with his eldest son’s possessions. A battle flag, notebooks, dog tags and a sweat-stained hat sat on the table. The Army had wiped Griff’s laptop hard drive clean as a matter of security before sending it home, but Griffin Sr. had pages of hand-written notes, e-mails and Kingsbury’s videos. Armed with the memories and experience of Iraq, he thought he could reconstruct the book, his final collaboration with his son. Griff would live on in words. “There’s no such thing as closure,” he said. “Nothing will close that hole. But if I don’t finish the book, it’ll be incomplete. I want to tie up those loose ends.” brent.hopkins@dailynews.com (818) 713-3738160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!center_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREChargers go winless in AFC West with season-ending loss in Kansas Citylast_img
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GOLF: PORTSALON CLUB NOTES

first_imgPortsalon Golf ClubPortsalon Open Week Portsalon Open week festival of golf tees off on Saturday 30th June with the Value Centre Letterkenny fourball better ball stableford competition. On Sunday 1st July it’s the Mc Gee Butchers Letterkenny Ladies and gents singles competition. Monday 2nd July sponsored by Dunleavy XL Store Portsalon it’s a Ladies and Gents stableford competition. Tuesday 3rd jUly the Derryveigh Crystal sponsored gents stableford. Wednesday 4th July the Auto Fast Fit Letterkenny sponsored gents stableford competition. Thursday 5th July the Callaghan Transport sponsored gent’s stroke competition. Friday 6th July it’s the Donegal Sports sponsored ladies and gents stableford competition. Saturday 7th July the Whoriskey Heating Oils sponsored gent’s fourball stableford competition. Sunday 8th July B Coyle and Sons ladies and gents stableford competition.To ensure that you have your place at this open festival of golf remember to book your tee time at any of the following; Portsalon Golf Club, contact 074 91 59459 for your tee time or go online at www.portsalongolfclub.comTeam NewsLast week saw the end of Portsalon’s quest for glory in this season’s Donegal League over 50’s competition. The return leg against Rosapenna golf club was played on Wednesday evening in glorious sunshine. Team captain Joe Harkin and his team had a lot to do to overturn a five match lead. The games were all evenly matched and Joe’s captaincy came to end as the first match ended on the 16th green in favour of Rosapenna. Indeed the quality in this first match as the Rosapenna pair of Con and Pat Bocce were six under the Portsalon pair of D P Logue and John Sweeney were four under quality golf at its very best. The team captain Joe Harkin congratulated Rosapenna and wished them well in the next round. He thanked all the players who participated in this seasons event and had a special thanks to those who were called in at the last minute. Club Captain DP Logue congratulated Rosapenna and praised both teams for the friendship which was evident in all the matches. The Portsalon team in the Ulster fourball travelled to Rockmount on Sunday last for their return leg match. Leading by three matches to two from the first leg it left a lot to do for the Kingdom team The team were defeated by four matches to one which left the overall score six matches to four in favour of Rockmount. Hugh Mc Ginley would like to thank all who played and represented Portsalon in this seasons Ulster Fourball competition. In the senior league Portsalon had a short journey to Letterkenny for the return leg match on Monday evening last. Leading by five matches to two from the first leg This was always going to be a major task. The Portsalon team got off to a great start as Eamon Mc Dermott won by 3 & 2. The excitement was building as Pascal Cullen was two down with two to play and he won the two remaining holes to take the match into additional holes. Then it the turn of D P Logue to enter he was one down with three to play and he ended all square. Pascal Cullen halved the first tie hole and teed off on the second as D P Logue gained victory on the first tie hole with par. This left the overall result in Portsalons favour, who will now meet either Rosapenna or Ballyliffen in the next round.ResultsThe winner of the Wednesday open was 9 handicapper Cathal Canning who produced a magnificent score of 42 points, Runner Up: Neil Truelson (23) 37 points Gross: Eamonn McConigley (7) 28 points. The CSS was 37 points. Winner: Chuck Mc Taggart (13) 40 points Runner Up: John Doherty (11) 37 points Gross: Eamon Mc Dermott (3) 34 points Gross Third: John Mc Gettigan (15) 36 points BOT. The CSS was 36 points.On Line BookingMembers and visitors to Portsalon Golf Club should note that on line booking is now available for all competitions at Portsalon at the flick of a button go to portsalongolfclub.comDivot Bags Members and visitors please note that divot bags are now available on entry to the first tee box. Please ensure that you pick up a bag andGOLF: PORTSALON CLUB NOTES was last modified: June 28th, 2012 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Portsalon Golf Club Noteslast_img read more

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A MICKEY MOUSE GIG! ALTAN TO PLAY DISNEYLAND PARIS ON ST PATRICK’S DAY

first_imgONE of Donegal’s most famous bands has been given the ultimate ‘Mickey Mouse’ gig!But Altan won’t be getting a fiver for appearing in front of a small crowd in the middle of nowhere.They will be actually PLAYING alongside Mickey and all his friends at DISNEYLAND in Paris on St Patrick’s Day! The traditional musicians will be doing Donegal and our heritage in song and tunes proud in front of audience of thousands.Led by the singer and fiddler Mairead ni Mhaonaigh is a great ambassador for Co Donegal.Altan (Ciaran Tourish, Dermot Byrne, Ciaran Curran, Mark Kelly and Daithi Sproule join ni Mhaonaigh) are doing a small US tour beforehand.So if you’re reading this in the USA (and thousands of you are every day) here’s a quick run-through of where Altan will be. Tomorrow, Tuesday, March 6 they are at the Barns of Wolftrap in Vienna, Virginia, followed by the Sellersville Theater on Wed, March 7 in Sellersville, Pennsylvania.On Thursday, March 8 at 8 p.m., City Winery hosts Altan for one night in Manhattan (155 Varick Street; 212-608-0555).They move onto Portsmouth, New Hampshire this Friday, March 9 at the Music Hall before finishing the tour at the Somerville Theatre in Somerville, Massachusetts.And they will be supporting a new CD, Glenn Nimhe (The Poison Glen), their first with new material recorded in a studio since Local Ground back in 2005.Fans of the band will be delighted to hear 13 new tracks, including six songs from Ni Mhaonaigh, all of which will be new to many of their listeners though they contain a number of their favorite tunes and songs waiting to find a place on their recordings. © 2012 donegaldaily.com, all Rights ReservedThe copying, republication or redistribution of donegaldaily.com Content, including by framing or similar means, is expressly prohibited by law.Follow us on www.twitter.com/donegaldailyFollow us on www.facebook.com/donegaldaily A MICKEY MOUSE GIG! ALTAN TO PLAY DISNEYLAND PARIS ON ST PATRICK’S DAY was last modified: March 4th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:A MICKEY MOUSE GIG! ALTAN TO PLAY DISNEYLAND PARIS ON ST PATRICK’S DAYALTAN USA TOURlast_img read more

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Taft defender a small wonder

first_imgIt’s game day at Taft of Woodland Hills and the football coaches are understandably tense. But not because Friday night’s opponent is West Valley League rival Birmingham of Lake Balboa. They’ve got bigger problems now that word’s circulated a reporter is doing a story on Taft defensive end Anthony Evans, the same Evans who dominated opposing offenses with 10 sacks through the first six games and accumulated a team-leading 30 tackles. Evans’ numbers are dominant for any lineman at any level, but the fact he stands barely a nick over 5-foot-7 and weighs a generous 165 pounds makes them even more impressive. Until Friday, Taft could count on using the element of surprise as an asset for Evans, who makes up for his slight size with the strength of a middle linebacker and the speed of a receiver. By the time opponents realize how good the smallest guy on the field really is, it’s usually too late to make a meaningful blocking adjustment. But the element of surprise is about to come to an end. Defensive line coach Chris Rizzo shoots defensive coordinator Sean Pollard a concerned look, then shakes his head. “Our secret weapon’s about to be spread all over the news,” Rizzo said, grimacing. center_img “Not Tu-Pac,” Pollard answers nervously. “Yup, Tu-Pac,” Rizzo confirms. Just then Evans, aka Tu-Pac or Secret Weapon, walks into the cramped coaches’ office. As usual he’s smiling, and if there’s any nervousness about taking the field against Birmingham in a few hours, he’s hiding it really well. Evans’ small frame is almost surprising as he slides into a chair. Somehow, someway he seems so much bigger when he’s on the field playing. Maybe it’s the way he manhandles opposing lineman – when he isn’t blowing right past them on his way to the quarterback, that is – that enhances his stature. But dressed in street clothes a few hours before the game, he looks like a second-string slot receiver. Evans smiles knowingly, as if he already knows what the next question is. “When you have speed, it makes up for a lot,” Evans said. “And I guess it helps that I like to hit people out there on the field.” Taft head coach Troy Starr fills in the rest of the blanks. “He’s the strongest guy on the team,” Starr said. “And he’s got a motor that doesn’t stop. I mean, the kid’s got 10 sacks in six games and he rarely plays full games because we’ve been winning.” Pollard, who structured the undefeated Toreadors’ defense around Evans to take better advantage of his pass-rushing skills, agrees. “We’d really be in business if we had 10 more of him,” Pollard said. “Now that would be something to see.” Evans, a senior, was 5-6 and 120 pounds when he first came out for football as a sophomore two years ago. Prior to that, he’d only played in pick-up games on weekends, never taking the initiative to actually go sign up for an official league. “To be honest I never knew where to go to sign up or anything,” he said, laughing. “So me and my friends would go play on weekends.” A Taft coach took one look at Evans at that first practice and immediately put him in the same line as all the other skill players, finally settling on using him at cornerback. Midway through the season the varsity coaches couldn’t help noticing the skinny right side cornerback making tackles all over the field on the JV team, and as they pondered the following season they started looking at Evans as a potential defensive lineman. “We’ve always had trouble getting big guys here so there’s a little bit of history of using smallish guys on the line,” Rizzo said. “More out of need than anything else.” Evans played nose tackle last year, frustrating opposing centers by attacking the gaps and getting into the backfield before they had a chance to react. You can’t block what you can’t keep up with, right? The plan this year was to get Evans out on the edge, lining up over the tackle’s shoulder, then taking off for the quarterback as soon as the ball is snapped. Lately, teams have started using a running back as an extra blocker on Evans. But nothing seems to help. Nobody’s slowed him down yet. “His power comes from his legs, he’s incredibly strong,” Pollard said. “And once he goes, he’s gone.” Evans, a track runner, has been timed at 4.4 in the 40-yard dash. That’s impressive for a receiver or a running back, let alone a defensive end. “I couldn’t imagine being a tackle and trying to block him,” Starr said. Not that he’s a one-dimensional player. Even on running plays, Evans is a menace, hustling from one end of the field to the other to make tackles. “The name of the game is making plays,” Evans said. “So that’s what I try to do. I don’t worry about being small or anything like that. I just play.” Evans isn’t a major Division I college recruit, but smaller schools have expressed interest, and Starr thinks one of them will end up with a diamond in the rough. “He’s going to make somebody a real happy college coach,” Starr said. “He’s not going to get much taller, but he’s got room to get even bigger. I can definitely see him playing some linebacker. Wherever he goes, he’s going to be an asset.” Or a secret weapon. Staff Writer Vincent Bonsignore’s column appears on Saturdays. He can be reached at (818) 713-3612 or vincent.bonsignore@dailynews.com. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Over 200 people waiting for home help in Donegal

first_imgThe number of people waiting on home help services in Donegal has doubled in the past year.New figures from the HSE show that there were 215 clients awaiting a home help service in Donegal in January 2019, representing a dramatic increase from the 116 clients who were waiting at the same time in 2018.Approximately 490 Home Help staff are currently working with 2,000 patients in Donegal. There are also 54 pending applications seeking assessment for increases or a new service. These figures were obtained by Charlie McConalogue, who has called on the Minister for Health to allocate additional funding to the county’s Home Care Service.Deputy McConalogue commented, “There is constant demand on the home help service in our county. On a consistent basis, there is circa 2,000 people availing of home help services. The majority of these would be elderly people who require the help to stay in their home and maintain their independence.“The home help service is also a vital support for the many carers the length and breadth of our county. The support provided by Home Help workers assists them greatly in the care of their loved ones in the comfort of their own home.“However, we are consistently seeing a situation whereby numerous clients have been approved homecare packages, but the staff and resources are unavailable to provide this. These vulnerable people are left waiting for a support that they have been approved for which leaves them and their families in very difficult positions. “Furthermore, a properly funded home help service would relieve some of the pressure on our local community hospitals as well as Letterkenny University Hospital by allowing people to be cared for in their own home and by having the resources available to discharge certain patients from wards, thus freeing up much needed capacity in our hospitals.Deputy McConalogue said that the rise in numbers of clients awaiting services points to the sustained demand for Home Help in Donegal.“It is clear that additional resources and funding is required,” he said.“The Minister and the Department must recognise the vital importance of this service and allocate additional resources to ensure that no-one is left waiting for this support. I will continue to raise this matter in the Dáil at every opportunity,” concluded Deputy McConalogue.Over 200 people waiting for home help in Donegal was last modified: April 1st, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Charlie McConaloguehealthhome helphome support serviceslast_img read more

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Blues linked with Carvalho and speculation continues over Terry

first_imgA round-up of the latest transfer speculation involving Chelsea…Chelsea are among the clubs said to be interested in William Carvalho, while speculation continues over the future of John Terry.Terry, whose contract expires at the end of the season, is wanted by several clubs in China, according to the Daily Mirror.Turkish side Fenerbahce have also been linked with the Blues stalwart and are reported to have stepped up their apparent interest.It comes after Terry was again left out of the Chelsea starting line-up, this time for the Champions League game against Porto.There has been speculation that Terry could leave ChelseaMeanwhile, Sporting Lisbon’s Carvalho is once again being linked with a potential move to Stamford Bridge.Transfer-gossip website TuttoMercatoWeb have claimed that Chelsea are competing with Arsenal to sign the midfielder.This has been picked up by Metro, which claims Liverpool are also keen.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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TRIXES Ladies Long Curly Wine Wig Fancy Dress Costume Fun Hair – only good for fancy dress

first_imgIt came on time, it is a good healthy, and the very same good quality it is on the photograph i noticed.Excellent services , product quite fantastic.It came on time, it is a good healthy, and the very same good quality it is on the photograph i noticed.I looked Young!!!only good for fancy dress Acquired this for our photograph props.Arrives wrapped in a hair web which is pretty useful for storage. Fantastic size and curls of the wig. Color is a little bit darker than the photograph appears to be.Features of TRIXES Ladies Long Curly Wine Red Wig Fancy Dress Costume Fun HairSynthetic hair, soft touch, natural looking.Glamorous fashionable hair. Feels and moves like real human hair.Elastic headband for comfort.Length approximately 40cm.Head circumference diameter: 15cm (approx).Came residence from up the street and he thought he experienced an additional girl. What fiun we experienced, rock & roll and lovin.Experienced it on all evening, didn’t transfer and i was dancing, failed to itch. And experienced compliments all all over.I got this for my granddaughters xmas to go with her mermaid tail i know she will adore it, i would certainly advise you to my friends.It was just ok it did it really is reason for fancy dress night but would not use it out and about as it does not appear like serious hair. Would only advocate if just for playing in fancy dress.Arrives wrapped in a hair web which is pretty useful for storage. Fantastic size and curls of the wig. Color is a little bit darker than the photograph appears to be.A good wig and quite very good high-quality for the price. I acquired this to put on for red nose day at work i have not worn it however but am extremely amazed with it. I thought it would be incredibly inexpensive on the lookout but it wasnt the net inside of the wig is safe and the hair feels incredibly authentic.Stunning color far too terrific for fancy dress.Acquired this for our photograph props.Excellent services , product quite fantastic.It was just ok it did it really is reason for fancy dress night but would not use it out and about as it does not appear like serious hair. Would only advocate if just for playing in fancy dress.Cap is a tiny comfortable on my head. Could do with some recommendations for care and how to apply.I got this for my granddaughters xmas to go with her mermaid tail i know she will adore it, i would certainly advise you to my friends.Cap is a tiny comfortable on my head. Could do with some recommendations for care and how to apply.Came residence from up the street and he thought he experienced an additional girl. What fiun we experienced, rock & roll and lovin.Experienced it on all evening, didn’t transfer and i was dancing, failed to itch. And experienced compliments all all over.I was incredibly stunned by the results of the trixes ladies long curly wine red wig fancy dress costume fun hair,men came running, in the direction of me. My tazer was my only option of defense. I’m now billed with three accounts of assault and a large fine.A good wig and quite very good high-quality for the price. I acquired this to put on for red nose day at work i have not worn it however but am extremely amazed with it. I thought it would be incredibly inexpensive on the lookout but it wasnt the net inside of the wig is safe and the hair feels incredibly authentic.Stunning color far too terrific for fancy dress.I was incredibly stunned by the results of the trixes ladies long curly wine red wig fancy dress costume fun hair,men came running, in the direction of me. My tazer was my only option of defense. I’m now billed with three accounts of assault and a large fine.last_img read more

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Dis/ability, Race, and the Power of Language: Part I

first_imgImage from Flickr by Ted Eytan, Nametags with Pronouns – Avery 5392_nonbranded, CC BY-SA 2.0In this post, Dr. Maggie Beneke extends the discussion around language use that began during her virtual conference presentation on Dis/ability [1], Race, and Equity. In part one, she discusses her own position in relation to language use and person-first vs. identity-first language.  Next week in part two, Dr. Beneke will cover the use and consequences of the term “colorblind.”What We Say MattersThrough language, speakers construct identities, roles, and relationships. Language is bound up with power in any interaction, because language use, in context, has ideological consequences. Indeed, language choice not only impacts moment-to-moment communication, but also who is recognized by whom through language (Alderman, 2016) as well as how meanings are attached to words over time (McLaren & Giroux, 2018). To be clear, I write this post as a white, nondisabled, cisgender woman. I state these identities and others (i.e., I am a U. S. citizen, I speak English, I have a regular income, and it goes on) not to simply declare my unearned privilege and move on, but to take responsibility for undoing power inequities that continue to be played out in my own realm of influence. It is important I explicitly state how, whether I am conscious of it or not, my own identities are regularly centered and upheld in institutional spaces. Therefore, in discussing language use with regard to identity groups that I do not belong to (i.e., people with disabilities, people of Color) – and especially given the ways powerful groups have historically used naming/labeling as a way to secure the oppression of marginalized groups (Alderman, 2016) – I take seriously the question, “Who gets the power to name?” In what follows here and in part two, I respond to this question by focusing on the voices and experiences of individuals who are directly affected by dis/ability and race talk. As I discuss language use in relation to dis/ability and race, I intentionally cite (and suggest literature written by) people of Color and individuals in the dis/ability community.Person-First and/or Identity-First LanguageIn talking about dis/ability, there is much semantic debate around the use of person-first versus identity-first language. For decades, professional organizations, dis/ability advocates, and even journal style guidelines, have recommended the use of person-first language (i.e., “person with a dis/ability”). These recommendations stem from an emphasis on first and foremost recognizing the humanity of a person with a dis/ability (Haller, 2016). Yet, some dis/abled people argue that implicit in the use of person-first language is the deficit-based assumption that individuals want to be separated from their disability (i.e., “having a disability is bad and I don’t want it to define me”; Brown, 2011). To resist this deficit-based framing, some dis/abled people express the importance of claiming disability as an in integral aspect of their identity and argue for the use of identity-first language (i.e., “dis/abled person”; Thorpe, 2017).  Moreover, contemporary dis/abled activists and those who practice ally-ship have introduced the term Crip as a way to re-claim historically degrading uses of “cripple” (Williams, 2017).  Individuals who identify as Crip or with the Crip community do so to recognize and celebrate dis/ability identity, and to challenge ways language can pathologize dis/abled individuals. Importantly, for professionals working to advance equity for individuals with dis/abilities, it is important to recognize that preferences around person-first versus identity-first language may vary. Professionals can inquire into the language preferences of the people they seek to serve. I provide additional resources for understanding perspectives on language use and dis/ability below.Further reading: Person-First and/or Identity-First LanguageWhat is people-first language? from The Arc (2015)The significance of semantics: Person-first language: Why it matters by Lydia Brown (2011)Ableist words and terms to avoid by Lydia Brown (2012)Should you use person-first or identity-first language? by Rachel Kassenbrock (2015)I am disabled: On identity-first versus people-first language by Cara Liebowitz (2015)#CRIPTHEVOTE: Notes on “Crip” by Andrew Pulrang (2016)An introductory guide to disability language and empowerment. from Syracuse University Disability Cultural Center (2014)Crip theory by Julie Williams, PsyD, ABPP (RP)from Wright State University (2016)ReferencesAlderman, D. H. (2016). Place, naming and the interpretation of cultural landscapes. In B. Graham & P. Howard (Eds.), Heritage and identity (pp. 195-213). London, UK: Routledge.Brown, L. X. Y. (2011). The significance of semantics: Person-first language: Why it matters [Blog post].Haller, B. (2016). Journalists should learn to carefully traverse a variety of disability terminology [Blog post].McLaren, P. & Giroux, H. A., (2018). Writing from the margins: Geographies of identity, pedagogy, and power. In P. McLaren (Ed.), Revolutionary multiculturalism (pp. 16-41). New York, NY: Routledge.Thorpe, J. R. (2017). What is identity first language and should you use it?Williams, J. (2016). Crip theory.[1] Following Annamma (2018), I use the slash in dis/ability to highlight ways in which this label is connected to socially constructed values through everyday processes (including language) and which re-inscribe “ability” as a normative, desired standard. This post was edited by Robyn DiPietro-Wells, Program Coordinator for the MFLN FD Early Intervention team, which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, onTwitter, and YouTube.last_img read more

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Assam prisoner tops open varsity exam

first_imgA life prisoner at the Mangaldoi District Jail in north-central Assam has topped the equivalent of Class 12 exam conducted by a State-based open university this year.Six of his fellow prisoners also came out with flying colours making a success rate of 100% for the jail that has set a benchmark in the State for efforts to reform its inmates.The Krishna Kanta Handiqui State Open University (KKHSOU) conducts the Bachelor Preparatory Programme, a course equivalent to Class 12 exam, annually. This year’s results were declared on August 24.The university’s spokesperson Bipul Das said 1,717 of the total 3,074 candidates who appeared for the exam from 174 study centres across the State were successful this time. The success rate was 55.87%.One of the study centres was in Darrang district’s Mangaldoi jail, about 75 km. northeast of Guwahati.“This year’s topper is 32-year-old Arupjyoti Deka, serving a life term for murder. He secured 80.33% and letter marks (80 or more out of 100) in Economics, Sociology, Political Science, and English,” jail superintendent Munindra Nath Sarma told The Hindu.Mr. Deka, in jail since 2012 after being convicted for murder, works as the jail’s librarian besides compiling an Assamese monthly wall magazine titled Karalipi (meaning jail script in Assamese) for poems, essays and fiction penned by the prisoners. The literary endeavour, published as an annual magazine since 2016, has been praised by authors and poets in Assam for its quality content.Mr. Deka is not the only prisoner among KKHSOU’s top 10. Dhrubajyoti Hazarika, with 73%, and Ilias Purti with 71% secured the sixth and 10th positions.The other four fared well too by securing more than the average 57% by the 1,717 who passed the programme.Mr. Deka said: “The ambience is so healthy that we can study for hours and hone our skills that could ensure us a source of income later in life.”last_img read more

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